The BBC Big Read 200 Best Books

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The Big Read was a survey on books carried out by the BBC in the United Kingdom in 2003, where over three quarters of a million votes were received from the British public to find the nation's best-loved novel of all time. The year-long survey was the biggest single test of public reading taste to date, and culminated with several programmes hosted by celebrities, advocating their favourite books.

Source of list: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Big_Read

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1 - The Lord of the Rings by J. R. R. Tolkien

The Lord of the Rings

In ancient times the Rings of Power were crafted by the Elven-smiths, and Sauron, the Dark Lord, forged the One Ring, filling it with his own power so that he could rule all others. But the One Ring was taken from him, and though he sought it throughout Middle-earth still it remained lost to him. After many ages it fell, by chance, into the hands of the hobbit, Bilbo Baggins. From his fastness in the Dark Tower of Mordor, Sauron’s power spread far and wide. He gathered all the Great Rings to him, but ever he searched far and wide for the One Ring that would complete his dominion. On his eleventy-first birthday, Bilbo disappeared, bequeathing to his young cousin, Frodo, the Ruling Ring, and a perilous quest: to journey across Middle-earth, deep into the shadow of the Dark Lord and destroy the Ring by casting it into the Cracks of Doom. The Lord of the Rings tells of the great quest undertaken by Frodo and the Fellowship of the Ring: Gandalf the wizard, Merry, Pippin and Sam, Gimli the Dwarf, Legolas the Elf, Boromir of Gondor, and a tall, mysterious stranger called Strider.

2 - Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen

Pride and Prejudice

'I had not known you a month before I felt that you were the last man in the world whom I could ever be prevailed on to marry.' Romance, misunderstandings, finding Mr Right and finding out who's Mr Wrong - Pride and Prejudice is as relevant today as it has ever been. It's the enchanting and enduring story of Lizzy Bennet (one of literature's most engaging heroines), proud Mr Darcy, of true love, families, villains and heroes and of course, pride and prejudice.

3 - Northern Lights: His Dark Materials 1 by Philip Pullman

Northern Lights: His Dark Materials 1

Lyra Belacqua and her animal daemon live half-wild and carefree among scholars of Jordan College, Oxford. The destiny that awaits her will take her to the frozen lands of the Arctic, where witch-clans reign and ice-bears fight. Her extraordinary journey will have immeasurable consequences far beyond her own world...

4 - The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy by Douglas Adams

The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy

One Thursday lunchtime Earth is unexpectedly demolished to make way for a new hyperspace bypass. For Arthur Dent, who has only just had his house demolished that morning, this is already more than he can cope with. Sadly, however, the weekend has only just begun. And the Galaxy is a very, very large and startling place indeed . . . THE HITCH HIKER'S GUIDE TO THE GALAXY became a massive cult success when it was first published and continues to sell all over the world. It introduced such memorable characters as Arthur Dent, Marvin the Paranoid Android, Zaphod Beeblebrox and, of course, the Vogons, and remains one of the funniest, most irreverent and entertaining novels ever.

5 - Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire (Book 4) by J.K. Rowling

Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire (Book 4)

The summer holidays are dragging on and Harry Potter can't wait for the start of the school year. It is his fourth year at Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardry and there are spells to be learnt and (unluckily) Potions and Divination lessons to be attended. But Harry can't know that the atmosphere is darkening around him, and his worst enemy is preparing a fate that it seems will be inescapable ...With characteristic wit, fast-paced humour and marvellous emotional depth, J.K. Rowling has proved herself yet again to be a master story-teller.

6 - To Kill A Mockingbird by Harper Lee

To Kill A Mockingbird

'Shoot all the bluejays you want, if you can hit 'em, but remember it's a sin to kill a mockingbird.' A lawyer's advice to his children as he defends the real mockingbird of Harper Lee's classic novel - a black man charged with the rape of a white girl. Through the young eyes of Scout and Jem Finch, Harper Lee explores with exuberant humour the irrationality of adult attitudes to race and class in the Deep South of the thirties. The conscience of a town steeped in prejudice, violence and hypocrisy is pricked by the stamina of one man's struggle for justice. But the weight of history will only tolerate so much. To Kill a Mockingbird is a coming-of-age story, an anti-racist novel, a historical drama of the Great Depression and a sublime example of the Southern writing tradition.

7 - Winnie-the-Pooh by A. A. Milne

Winnie-the-Pooh

A story about Winnie-the-Pooh, the famous bear in the world, in which Pooh goes visiting and Piglet meets a Heffalump. Eeyore loses his tail and Pooh finds one!

8 - 1984 Nineteen Eighty-Four by George Orwell

1984 Nineteen Eighty-Four

Since its publication in 1946, George Orwell's fable of a workers' revolution gone wrong has been recognized as a classic of modern political satire. Fuelled by Orwell's intense disillusionment with Soviet Communism, Animal Farm is a nearly perfect piece of writing--both an engaging story and an allegory that actually works. When the downtrodden beasts of Manor Farm oust their drunken human master and take over management of the land, all are awash in collectivist zeal. Everyone willingly works overtime, productivity soars and for one brief, glorious season, every belly is full. The animals' Seven Commandment credo is painted in big white letters on the barn. All animals are equal. No animal shall drink alcohol, wear clothes, sleep in a bed or kill a fellow four-footed creature. Those that go upon four legs or wings are friends and the two-legged are, by definition, the enemy. Too soon, however, the pigs, who have styled themselves leaders by virtue of their intelligence, succumb to the temptations of privilege and power. "We pigs are brainworkers. The whole management and organisation of the farm depend on us. Day and night, we are watching over your welfare. It is for your sake that we drink that milk and eat those apples." While this swinish brotherhood sells out the revolution, cynically editing the Seven Commandments to excuse their violence and greed, the common animals are once again left hungry and exhausted, no better off than in the days when humans ran the farm. Satire Animal Farm may be, but it's a stony reader who remains unmoved when the stalwart workhorse, Boxer, having given his all to his comrades, is sold to the glue factory to buy booze for the pigs. Orwell's view of Communism is bleak indeed, but given the history of the Russian people since 1917, his pessimism has an air of prophecy. --Joyce Thompson

9 - The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe by C. S. Lewis

The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe

Lucy has stumbled upon a land of fauns and centaurs, nymphs and talking animals, all behind a wardrobe. Narnia is ruled by the cruel White Witch, and can only be freed by Aslan, the great lion and four children.

10 - Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte

Jane Eyre

Jane Eyre ranks as one of the greatest and most perennially popular works of English fiction. Although the poor but plucky heroine is outwardly of plain appearance, she possesses an indomitable spirit, a sharp wit and great courage. She is forced to battle against the exigencies of a cruel guardian, a harsh employer and a rigid social order. All of which circumscribe her life and position when she becomes governess to the daughter of the mysterious, sardonic and attractive Mr Rochester. However, there is great kindness and warmth in this epic love story, which is set against the magnificent backdrop of the Yorkshire moors. Ultimately the grand passion of Jane and Rochester is called upon to survive cruel revelation, loss and reunion, only to be confronted with tragedy.

11 - Catch-22 by Joseph Heller

Catch-22

Features a satirical indicement of military madness and stupidity, and the desire of the ordinary man to survive it. This work tells a tale of the dangerously sane Captain Yossarian, who spends his time in Italy plotting to survive.

12 - Wuthering Heights by Emily Bronte

Wuthering Heights

Lockwood, the new tenant of Thrushcross Grange on the bleak Yorkshire Moors, is forced to seek shelter one night at Wuthering Heights, the home of his landlord. There he discovers the history of the tempestuous events that took place years before.

13 - Birdsong by Sebastian Faulks

Birdsong

Set before and during the great war, Birdsong captures the drama of that era on both a national and a personal scale. It is the story of Stephen, a young Englishman, who arrives in Amiens in 1910. His life goes through a series of traumatic experiences, from the clandestine love affair that tears apart the family with whom he lives, to the unprecedented experiences of the war itself.

14 - Rebecca by Daphne Du Maurier

Rebecca

Last night I dreamt I went to Manderley again . . .Working as a lady's companion, the heroine of Rebecca learns her place. Life begins to look very bleak until, on a trip to the South of France, she meets Maxim de Winter, a handsome widower whose sudden proposal of marriage takes her by surprise. She accepts, but whisked from glamorous Monte Carlo to the ominous and brooding Manderley, the new Mrs de Winter finds Max a changed man. And the memory of his dead wife Rebecca is forever kept alive by the forbidding Mrs Danvers . . .Not since Jane Eyre has a heroine faced such difficulty with the Other Woman. An international bestseller that has never gone out of print, Rebecca is the haunting story of a young girl consumed by love and the struggle to find her identity.

15 - The Catcher in the Rye by J. D. Salinger

The Catcher in the Rye

Since his debut in 1951 as The Catcher in the Rye, Holden Caulfield has been synonymous with "cynical adolescent." Holden narrates the story of a couple of days in his sixteen-year-old life, just after he's been expelled from prep school, in a slang that sounds edgy even today and keeps this novel on banned book lists. It begins, "If you really want to hear about it, the first thing you'll probably want to know is where I was born and what my lousy childhood was like, and how my parents were occupied and all before they had me, and all that David Copperfield kind of crap, but I don't feel like going into it, if you want to know the truth. In the first place, that stuff bores me, and in the second place, my parents would have about two hemorrhages apiece if I told anything pretty personal about them." His constant wry observations about what he encounters, from teachers to phonies (the two of course are not mutually exclusive) capture the essence of the eternal teenage experience of alienation.

16 - The Wind in the Willows by Kenneth Grahame

The Wind in the Willows

Originally written as a series of bedtime stories for the author's son, "The Wind in the Willows" is a classic of children's literature that can equally be enjoyed by adults. It tells the adventures of the Toad, the Mole, the Rat, and the Badger who all live along or by the riverbank

17 - Great Expectations by Charles Dickens

Great Expectations

Traces growth of the book's narrator, Philip Pirrip (Pip), from a boy of shallow dreams to a man with depth of character. As Pip unravels truth behind his own expectations in his quest to become a gentleman, the mysteries of past and the fate through a series of adventures steers him towards maturity and an important discovery.

18 - Little Women by Louisa May Alcott

Little Women

The beloved story of the March girls is a classic American novel, telling the story of four sisters: independent, tomboyish Jo; delicate, loving Beth; pretty, kind Meg; and precocious, beautiful Amy, the baby of the family. The charming story of these four "little women" and their wise and patient mother Marmee enduring hardships and enjoying adventures in Civil War New England was an instant success when first published in 1868 and has been adored for generations.

19 - Captain Corelli's Mandolin by Louis de Bernieres

Captain Corelli's Mandolin

It is 1941 and Captain Antonio Corelli, a young Italian officer, is posted to the Greek island of Cephallonia as part of the occupying forces. When the local doctor's daughter's letters to her fiance go unanswered, the working of the eternal triangle seems inevitable.

20 - War and Peace by Leo Tolstoy

War and Peace

This epic novel is centred on Napoleon's war with Russia. It expresses Tolstoy's view that history is an inexorable process which man cannot influence. Three of the characters, Natasha Rostov, Prince Andrew Bolkonsky and Pierre Bezukhov illustrate Tolstoy's philosophy.

21 - Gone with the Wind by Margaret Mitchell

Gone with the Wind

Tomorrow is another day... Set against the dramatic backdrop of the American Civil War, Margaret Mitchell's magnificent historical epic is an unforgettable tale of love and loss, of a nation mortally divided and a people forever changed. Above all, it is the story of beautiful, ruthless Scarlett O'Hara and the dashing soldier of fortune, Rhett Butler.

22 - Harry Potter and the Philosopher's Stone (Book 1) by J.K. Rowling

Harry Potter and the Philosopher's Stone (Book 1)

Harry Potter is an ordinary boy who lives in a cupboard under the stairs at his Aunt Petunia and Uncle Vernon's house, which he thinks is normal for someone like him who's parents have been killed in a 'car crash'. He is bullied by them and his fat, spoilt cousin Dudley, and lives a very unremarkable life with only the odd hiccup (like his hair growing back overnight!) to cause him much to think about. That is until an owl turns up with a letter addressed to Harry and all hell breaks loose! He is literally rescued by a world where nothing is as it seems and magic lessons are the order of the day. Read and find out how Harry discovers his true heritage at Hogwarts School of Wizardry and Witchcraft, the reason behind his parents mysterious death, who is out to kill him, and how he uncovers the most amazing secret of all time, the fabled Philosopher's Stone! All this and muggles too. Now, what are they?

23 - Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets (Book 2) by J.K. Rowling

Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets (Book 2)

Harry Potter is a wizard. He is in his second year at Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardry. Little does he know that this year will be just as eventful as the last ...even getting there is an adventure in itself! The three firm friends, Harry, Ron and Hermione, are soon immersed in the daily round of Potions, Herbology, Charms, Defence Against the Dark Arts, and Quidditch. But then horrible and mysterious things begin to happen. Harry keeps hearing strange voices, sinister and dark messages appear on the wall, and then Ron's sister Ginny disappears...

24 - Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban (Book 3) by J.K. Rowling

Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban (Book 3)

Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban is the third, and possibly the best, book in the phenomenally successful, award-winning Harry Potter series by JK Rowling. After just about surviving yet another summer with the dreadful Dursleys, the arrival of Aunt Marge is the final straw and, in a fit of anger, Harry casts a spell on her, causing her to blow up like a balloon. He fully expects to be expelled from Hogwarts for his blatant flaunting of the rule not to use magic outside term time, but the arrival of the mysterious Knight Bus and a meeting with Cornelius Fudge, the Minister of Magic, result in Harry enjoying the rest of the holidays in the wonderful surroundings of the Leaky Cauldron.Meanwhile Sirius Black--one-time friend of Harry's parents, implicated in their murder and follower of "You-Know-Who"--escapes from Azkaban and this has serious implications for Harry. Back at Hogwarts, Harry's movements are restricted by the presence of the Dementors--guards from Azkaban on the look-out for Black.Stephen Fry's endearingly snooty vocal chords are a perfect match for Rowling's superb storytelling, and Fry manages to give even further depth to a complex and absorbing plot by adding an irreverent wit and a deep-rooted touch of class to a compelling and magical tale that, once heard, will never be forgotten. --Susan Harrison

25 - The Hobbit by J. R. R. Tolkien

The Hobbit

Read the definitive edition of Bilbo Baggins’ adventures in middle-earth in this classic bestseller behind this year’s biggest movie. The Hobbit is a tale of high adventure, undertaken by a company of dwarves in search of dragon-guarded gold. A reluctant partner in this perilous quest is Bilbo Baggins, a comfort-loving unambitious hobbit, who surprises even himself by his resourcefulness and skill as a burglar. Encounters with trolls, goblins, dwarves, elves and giant spiders, conversations with the dragon, Smaug, and a rather unwilling presence at the Battle of Five Armies are just some of the adventures that befall Bilbo. Bilbo Baggins has taken his place among the ranks of the immortals of children’s fiction. Written by Professor Tolkien for his own children, The Hobbit met with instant critical acclaim when published.

26 - Tess of the D'Urbervilles by Thomas Hardy

Tess of the D'Urbervilles

'My life looks as if it had been wasted for want of chances! When I see what you know, what you have read, and seen, and thought, I feel what a nothing I am!' Challenging the hypocrisy and social conventions of the rural Victorian world, Tess of the D'Urbervilles follows the story of Tess Durbeyfield as she attempts to escape the poverty of her background, seeking wealth by claiming connection with the aristocratic D'Urberville family. It is through Tess's relationships with two very different men that Hardy tells the story of his tragic heroine, and exposes the double standards of the world that she inhabits with searing pathos and heart-rending sentiment.

27 - Middlemarch by George Eliot

Middlemarch

Middlemarch is a complex tale of idealism, disillusion, profligacy, loyalty and frustrated love. This penetrating analysis of the life of an English provincial town during the time of social unrest prior to the Reform Bill of 1832 is told through the lives of Dorothea Brooke and Dr Tertius Lydgate and includes a host of other paradigm characters who illuminate the condition of English life in the mid-nineteenth century. Henry James described Middlemarch as a ‘treasurehouse of detail’ while Virginia Woolf famously endorsed George Eliot’s masterpiece as ‘one of the few English novels written for grown-up people.

28 - A Prayer For Owen Meany by John Irving

A Prayer For Owen Meany

Eleven-year-old Owen Meany, playing in a Little League baseball game in Gravesend, New Hampshire, hits a foul ball and kills his best friend's mother. Owen doesn't believe in accidents; he believes he is God's instrument. What happens to Owen after that 1953 foul ball is both extraordinary and terrifying.

29 - The Grapes of Wrath by John Steinbeck

The Grapes of Wrath

1940 Pulitzer Prize winner. Moving story of a family, moved out of the Oklohoma dust bowl region by economic desperation, who head for California as migrant fruit pickers - finally defeated but still resolute.

30 - Alice's Adventures in Wonderland and Through the Looking Glass by Lewis Carroll

Alice's Adventures in Wonderland and Through the Looking Glass

Bored on a hot afternoon, Alice follows a White Rabbit down a rabbit-hole without giving a thought about how she might get out. And so she tumbles into Wonderland. In a land in which nothing is as it seems and cakes and mushrooms can make her shrink to ten inches or grow to the size of a house, will Alice be able to find her way home again?

31 - The Story of Tracy Beaker by Jacqueline Wilson

The Story of Tracy Beaker

Tracy is ten years old. She lives in a Children's Home but would like a real home one day, with a real family. Meet Tracy, follow her story and share her hopes for the future in this funny tale, told in Tracy's own words.

32 - One Hundred Years of Solitude by Gabriel Garcia Marquez

One Hundred Years of Solitude

As Melquiades excites Buendia's father with new inventions and tales of adventure, neither can know the significance of the indecipherable manuscript that the gypsy passes into their hands. The tribulations of the Buendia household push memories of the manuscript aside. Few remember its existence and one will discover the message that it holds.

33 - The Pillars of the Earth by Ken Follett

The Pillars of the Earth

The Pillars of the Earth tells the story of Philip, prior of Kingsbridge, a devout and resourceful monk driven to build the greatest Gothic cathedral the world has known . . . of Tom, the mason who becomes his architect - a man divided in his soul . . . of the beautiful, elusive Lady Aliena, haunted by a secret shame . . . and of a struggle between good and evil that will turn church against state, and brother against brother. A spellbinding epic tale of ambition, anarchy, and absolute power set against the sprawling medieval canvas of twelfth-century England, this is Ken Follett's historical materpiece. 'Enormous and brilliant . . . this mammoth tale seems to touch all human emotion - love and hate, loyalty and treachery, hope and despair.

34 - David Copperfield by Charles Dickens

David Copperfield

When David Copperfield escapes from the cruelty of his childhood home, he embarks on a journey to adulthood which will lead him through comedy and tragedy, love and heartbreak and friendship and betrayal.

35 - Charlie and the Chocolate Factory by Roald Dahl

Charlie and the Chocolate Factory

The famous Roald Dahl story of Charlie Bucket and his Golden Ticket, and Willy Wonka and his amazing chocolate factory.

36 - Treasure Island by Robert Louis Stevenson

Treasure Island

Stevenson's classic tale of buccaneers, a treasure map, and a hunt for buried gold introduced the character of Long John Silver and brought moral ambiguity into children's books.

37 - A Town Like Alice by Nevil Shute Norway

A Town Like Alice

Jean Paget is just twenty years old and working in Malaya when the Japanese invasion begins. When she is captured she joins a group of other European women and children whom the Japanese force to march for miles through the jungle - an experience that leads to the deaths of many.

38 - Persuasion by Jane Austen

Persuasion

The romance between Captain Wentworth and Anne, the daughter of Sir Walter Elliot, seems doomed because of the young man's family connections and lack of wealth.

39 - Dune by Frank Herbert

Dune

The epic story of the planet Arrakis, its Atreides rulers and their mortal enemies the Harkonnens is the finest, most widely acclaimed and enduring science fiction novel of this century. Huge in scope, towering in concept, it is a work that will live on in the reader's imagination.

40 - Emma by Jane Austen

Emma

When spirited socialite Emma Woodhouse appoints herself matchmaker to her gentle Harriet, she can't possibly image the chaos she will create . Yet might this social disorder bring a match for Emma herself? One she would never haved guessed.

41 - Anne of Green Gables by L. M. Montgomery

Anne of Green Gables

Marilla and Matthew Cuthbert are in for a big surprise. They are waiting for an orphan boy to help with the work at Green Gables - but a skinny, red-haired girl turns up instead. Feisty and full of spirit, Anne Shirley charms her way into the Cuthberts' affection with her vivid imagination and constant chatter.

42 - Watership Down by Richard Adams

Watership Down

Fiver could sense danger. Something terrible was going to happen to the warren - he felt sure of it. So did his brother Hazel, for Fiver's sixth sense was never wrong. They had to leave immediately, and they had to persuade the other rabbits to join them. And so begins a long and perilous journey of a small band of rabbits in search of a safe home. Fiver's vision finally leads them to Watership Down, but here they face their most difficult challenge of all . . . Watership Down is an epic journey, a stirring tale of adventure, courage and survival against the odds.

43 - The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald

The Great Gatsby

Jay Gatsby is the man who has everything. But one thing will always be out of his reach. Everybody who is anybody is seen at his glittering parties. Day and night his Long Island mansion buzzes with bright young things drinking, dancing and debating his mysterious character.

44 - The Count of Monte Cristo by Alexandre Dumas

The Count of Monte Cristo

The ultimate story of escape to riches, revenge and redemption by 'the Napoleon of storytellers'.

45 - Brideshead Revisited: The Sacred and Profane Memories of Captain Charles Ryder by Evelyn Waugh

Brideshead Revisited: The Sacred and Profane Memories of Captain Charles Ryder

Evelyn Waugh's most celebrated novel is a memory drama about the intense entanglement of the narrator, Charles Ryder, with a great Anglo-Catholic family. Written during World War II, the novel mourns the passing of the aristocratic world Waugh knew in his youth and vividly recalls the sensuous plea?sures denied him by wartime austerities; in so doing it also provides a profound study of the conflict between the demands of religion and the desires of the flesh. At once romantic, sensuous, comic, and somber, "Brideshead Revisited" transcends Waugh's familiar satiric exploration of his cast of lords and ladies, Catholics and eccentrics, artists and misfits, revealing him to be an elegiac, lyrical novelist of the utmost feeling and lucidity.

46 - Animal Farm: A Fairy Story by George Orwell

Animal Farm: A Fairy Story

Since its publication in 1946, George Orwell's fable of a workers' revolution gone wrong has been recognized as a classic of modern political satire. Fuelled by Orwell's intense disillusionment with Soviet Communism, Animal Farm is a nearly perfect piece of writing--both an engaging story and an allegory that actually works. When the downtrodden beasts of Manor Farm oust their drunken human master and take over management of the land, all are awash in collectivist zeal. Everyone willingly works overtime, productivity soars and for one brief, glorious season, every belly is full. The animals' Seven Commandment credo is painted in big white letters on the barn. All animals are equal. No animal shall drink alcohol, wear clothes, sleep in a bed or kill a fellow four-footed creature. Those that go upon four legs or wings are friends and the two-legged are, by definition, the enemy. Too soon, however, the pigs, who have styled themselves leaders by virtue of their intelligence, succumb to the temptations of privilege and power. "We pigs are brainworkers. The whole management and organisation of the farm depend on us. Day and night, we are watching over your welfare. It is for your sake that we drink that milk and eat those apples." While this swinish brotherhood sells out the revolution, cynically editing the Seven Commandments to excuse their violence and greed, the common animals are once again left hungry and exhausted, no better off than in the days when humans ran the farm. Satire Animal Farm may be, but it's a stony reader who remains unmoved when the stalwart workhorse, Boxer, having given his all to his comrades, is sold to the glue factory to buy booze for the pigs. Orwell's view of Communism is bleak indeed, but given the history of the Russian people since 1917, his pessimism has an air of prophecy.

47 - A Chrismas Carol by Charles Dickens

A Chrismas Carol

The tale begins on Christmas Eve seven years after the death of Ebenezer Scrooge's business partner Jacob Marley. Scrooge is established within the first stave (chapter) as a greedy and stingy businessman who has no place in his life for kindness, compassion, charity, or benevolence. After being warned by Marley's ghost to change his ways, Scrooge is visited by three additional ghosts "each in its turn" who accompany him to various scenes with the hope of achieving his transformation. The first of the spirits, the Ghost of Christmas Past, takes Scrooge to the scenes of his boyhood and youth which stir the old miser's gentle and tender side by reminding him of a time when he was more innocent. The second spirit, the Ghost of Christmas Present, takes Scrooge to several radically differing scenes (a joy-filled market of people buying the makings of Christmas dinner, the family feast of Scrooge's near-impoverished clerk Bob Cratchit, a miner's cottage, and a lighthouse among other sites) in order to evince from the miser a sense of responsibility for his fellow man. The third spirit, the Ghost of Christmas Yet to Come, harrows Scrooge with dire visions of the future if he does not learn and act upon what he has witnessed. Scrooge's own neglected and untended grave is revealed, prompting the miser to aver that he will change his ways in hopes of changing these "shadows of what may be." In the fifth and final stave, Scrooge awakens Christmas morning with joy and love in his heart, then spends the day with his nephew's family after anonymously sending a prize turkey to the Crachit home for Christmas dinner. Scrooge has become a different man overnight, and now treats his fellow men with kindness, generosity, and compassion, gaining a reputation as a man who embodies the spirit of Christmas. The story closes with the narrator confirming the validity, completeness, and permanence of Scrooge's transformation.

48 - Far from the Madding Crowd by Thomas Hardy

Far from the Madding Crowd

Far from the Madding Crowd is perhaps the most pastoral of Hardy's Wessex novels. It tells the story of the young farmer Gabriel Oak and his love for and pursuit of the elusive Bathsheba Everdene, whose wayward nature leads her to both tragedy and true love. It tells of the dashing Sergeant Troy whose rakish philosophy of life was '...the past was yesterday; never, the day after'. And lastly, of the introverted and reclusive gentleman farmer, Mr Boldwood, whose love fills him with '...a fearful sense of exposure', when he first sets eyes on Bathsheba. The background of this tale is the Wessex countryside in all its moods, contriving to make it one of the most English of great English novels.

49 - Goodnight Mister Tom by Michelle Magorian

Goodnight Mister Tom

Young Willie Beech is evacuated to the country as Britain stands on the brink of WW2. A sad, deprived child, he slowly begins to flourish under the care of old Tom Oakley - but his new-found happiness is shattered by a summons from his mother back in London.

50 - The Shell Seekers by Rosamunde Pilcher

The Shell Seekers

Artist's daughter, Penelope can look back on a full and varied life: a Bohemian childhood in London and Cornwall, an unhappy wartime marriage, and the one man she truly loved. She has brought up three children - and learned to accept them as they are. Yet, she is far too energetic and independent to settle sweetly into pensioned-off old-age.

51 - The Secret Garden by Frances Hodgson Burnett

The Secret Garden

After losing her parents, young Mary Lennox is sent from India to live in her uncle's gloomy mansion on the wild English moors. She is lonely and has no one to play with, but one day she learns of a secret garden somewhere in the grounds that no one is allowed to enter. Then Mary uncovers an old key in a flowerbed – and a gust of magic leads her to the hidden door. Slowly she turns the key and enters a world she could never have imagined.

52 - Of Mice and Men by John Steinbeck

Of Mice and Men

As drifters in search of work, George and his simple-minded friend Lennie have nothing in the world except each other - and a dream that they will one day have some land of their own. Eventually, they find work on a ranch, but their hopes are doomed as Lennie becomes a victim of his own strength.

53 - The Stand by Stephen King

The Stand

In 1978, science fiction writer Spider Robinson wrote a scathing review of The Stand in which he exhorted his readers to grab strangers in bookshops and beg them not to buy it. The Stand is like that. You either love it or hate it, but you can't ignore it. Stephen King's most popular book, according to polls of his fans, is an end-of-the-world scenario: a rapidly mutating flu virus is accidentally released from a U.S. military facility and wipes out 99 and 44/100 percent of the world's population, thus setting the stage for an apocalyptic confrontation between Good and Evil. "I love to burn things up," King says. "It's the werewolf in me, I guess.... The Stand was particularly fulfilling, because there I got a chance to scrub the whole human race, and man, it was fun! ... Much of the compulsive, driven feeling I had while I worked on The Stand came from the vicarious thrill of imagining an entire entrenched social order destroyed in one stroke." There is much to admire in The Stand: the vivid thumbnail sketches with which King populates a whole landscape with dozens of believable characters; the deep sense of nostalgia for things left behind; the way it subverts our sense of reality by showing us a world we find familiar, then flipping it over to reveal the darkness underneath. Anyone who wants to know, or claims to know, the heart of the American experience needs to read this book. --Fiona Webster

54 - Anna Karenina by L.N. Tolstoy

Anna Karenina

Presents the nineteenth-century Russian novelist's classic in which a young woman is destroyed when she attempts to live outside the moral law of her society

55 - A Suitable Boy by Vikram Seth

A Suitable Boy

Vikram Seth's novel is at its core a love story, the tale of Lata - and her mother's attempts to find her a suitable husband, through love or through exacting maternal appraisal. Set in post-Independence India and involving the lives of four large families and those who orbit them, it is also a vast panoramic exploration of a whole continent at a crucial hour as a sixth of the world's population faces its first great General Election and the chance to map its own destiny. 'A SUITABLE BOY may prove to be the most fecund as well as the most prodigious work of the latter half of this century - perhaps even the book to restore the serious reading public's faith in the contemporary novel ... You should make time for it. It will keep you company for the rest of your life' Daniel Johnson, The Times

56 - The BFG by Roald Dahl

The BFG

The Big Friendly Giant is one of Dahls most lovable characters. Whether galloping off with Sophie nestled next to his ear; speaking his delightful, jumbled, squib-fangled patois; or whizzpopping for the Queen, he leaves an indelible impression of bigheartedness.

57 - Swallows and Amazons by Arthur Ransome

Swallows and Amazons

'Swallows and Amazons for ever!' The Walker children - also known as Captain John, Mate Susan, Able-Seaman Titty, and Ship's Boy Roger - set sail on the Swallow and head for Wild Cat Island. There they camp under open skies, swim in clear water and go fishing for their dinner. But their days are disturbed by the Blackett sisters, the fierce Amazon pirates. The Swallows and Amazons decide to battle it out, and so begins a summer of unforgettable discoveries and incredible adventures.

58 - Black Beauty by Anna Sewell

Black Beauty

Anna Sewell's famous 'Autobiography of a Horse' is a Victorian and children's classic. Written to expose and prevent cruelty to horses in Victorian England, the novel's appeal as animal story, horse-care manual, protest work, feminist text and slave narrative is fully explored in this new edition.

59 - Artemis Fowl by Eoin Colfer

Artemis Fowl

Twelve-year-old villain, Artemis Fowl, is the most ingenious criminal mastermind in history. His bold and daring plan is to hold a leprechaun to ransom. But he's taking on more than he bargained for when he kidnaps Captain Holly Short of the LEPrecon (Lower Elements Police Reconnaissance Unit).

60 - Crime and Punishment by Fyodor Dostoevsky

Crime and Punishment

A desperate young man plans the perfect crime -- the murder of a despicable pawnbroker, an old women no one loves and no one will mourn. Is it not just, he reasons, for a man of genius to commit such a crime, to transgress moral law -- if it will ultimately benefit humanity? So begins one of the greatest novels ever written: a powerful psychological study, a terrifying murder mystery, a fascinating detective thriller infused with philosophical, religious and social commentary. Raskolnikov, an impoverished student living in a garret in the gloomy slums of St. Petersburg, carries out his grotesque scheme and plunges into a hell of persecution, madness and terror. Crime And Punishment takes the reader on a journey into the darkest recesses of the criminal and depraved mind, and exposes the soul of a man possessed by both good and evil ... a man who cannot escape his own conscience.From the Paperback edition.

61 - Noughts & Crosses (Part1 of Noughts & Crosses Trilogy) by Malorie Blackman

Noughts & Crosses (Part1 of Noughts & Crosses Trilogy)

Sephy is a Cross - a member of the dark-skinned ruling class. Callum is a nought - a colourless member of the underclass who were once slaves to the Crosses. Against a background of prejudice and distrust, highlighted by violent terrorist activity by Noughts, a romance builds between them - a romance that is to lead both of them into danger.

62 - Memoirs Of A Geisha by Arthur Golden

Memoirs Of A Geisha

This story is a rare and utterly engaging experience. It tells the extraordinary story of a geisha -summoning up a quarter century from 1929 to the post-war years of Japan's dramatic history, and opening a window into a half-hidden world of eroticism and enchantment, exploitation and degradation. A young peasant girl is sold as servant and apprentice to a renowned geisha house. She tells her story many years later from the Waldorf Astoria in New York. Her memoirs conjure up the perfection and the ugliness of life behind rice-paper screens, where young girls learn the arts of geisha - dancing and singing, how to wind the kimono, how to walk and pour tea, and how to beguile the most land's powerful men.

63 - A Tale of Two Cities by Charles Dickens

A Tale of Two Cities

"It was the best of times, it was the worst of times", "It is a far, far better rest that I go to than I have ever known" - so the novel begins and ends with some of Dicken's best-known words, and between the two is every Briton's view of the worst excesses of the French Revolution.

64 - The Thorn Birds by Colleen McCullough

The Thorn Birds

Sometimes when he didn't know he was being watched Meggie would look at him and try desperately to imprint his face upon her brain's core . . . And he would turn to find her watching him, a look in his eyes of haunted grief, a doomed look. She understood the implicit message, or thought she did; he must go, back to the Church and his duties. Never again with the same spirit, perhaps, but more able to serve. For only those who have slipped and fallen know the vicissitudes of the way . . .

65 - Mort: A Discworld Novel by Terry Pratchett

Mort: A Discworld Novel

Death comes to us all. When he came to Mort, he offered him a job. After being assured that being dead was not compulsory, Mort accepted. However, he soon found that romantic longings did not mix easily with the responsibilities of being Death's apprentice...

66 - The Magic Faraway Tree by Enid Blyton

The Magic Faraway Tree

When Joe, Beth and Frannie move to a new home, an Enchanted Wood is on their doorstep. And when they discover the Faraway Tree, that is the beginning of many magical adventures! This work lets you join them and their friends Moonface, Saucepan Man and Silky the fairy as they discover which new land is at the top of the Faraway Tree.

67 - The Magus by John Fowles

The Magus

On a remote Greek Island, Nicholas Urfe finds himself embroiled in the deceptions of a master trickster. As reality and illusion intertwine, Urfe is caught up in the darkest of psychological games.

68 - Good Omens by Terry Pratchett & Neil Gaiman

Good Omens

There is a hint of Armageddon in the air. According to the Nice and Accurate Prophecies of Agnes Nutter, Witch (recorded, thankfully, in 1655, before she blew up her entire village and all its inhabitants, who had gathered to watch her burn), the world will end on a Saturday. Next Saturday, in fact. So the Armies of Good and Evil are massing, the four Bikers of the Apocalypse are revving up their mighty hogs and hitting the road, and the world's last two remaining witchfinders are getting ready to Fight the Good Fight. Atlantis is rising. Frogs are falling. Tempers are flaring, and everything appears to be going to Divine Plan. Except that a somewhat fussy angel and a fast-living demon are not particularly looking forward to the coming Rapture. They've lived amongst Humanity for millennia, and have grown rather fond of the lifestyle. So if Crowley and Aziraphale are going to stop it from happening, they've got to find and kill the AntiChrist (which is a shame, really, as he's a nice kid). There's just one glitch: someone seems to have misplaced him. Terry Pratchett and Neil Gaiman's brilliantly dark and funny take on mankind's final judgment is back, in a new hardcover edition which includes an introduction by the authors, comments by each about the other, and answers to some still-burning questions about their wildly popular collaborative effort that the devout and the damned alike will surely cherish until the end of all things.

69 - Guards! Guards!: A Discworld Novel by Terry Pratchett

Guards! Guards!: A Discworld Novel

Here there be dragons...and the denizens of Ankh-Morpork wish one huge firebreather would return from whence it came. Long believed extinct, a superb specimen of "draco nobilis" ("noble dragon" for those who don't understand italics) has appeared in Discworld's greatest city. Not only does this unwelcome visitor have a nasty habit of charbroiling everything in its path, in rather short order it is crowned King (it is a "noble" dragon, after all...).

70 - Lord of the Flies by William Golding

Lord of the Flies

A plane crashes on an uninhabited island and the only survivors, a group of schoolboys, assemble on the beach and wait to be rescued. By day they inhabit a land of bright fantastic birds and dark blue seas, but at night their dreams are haunted by the image of a terrifying beast. In this, his first novel, William Golding gave the traditional adventure story an ironic, devastating twist. The boys' delicate sense of order fades, and their childish fears are transformed into something deeper and more primitive. Their games take on a horrible significance, and before long the well-behaved party of schoolboys has turned into a tribe of faceless, murderous savages.

71 - Perfume: The Story of a Murderer by Patrick Suskind

Perfume: The Story of a Murderer

Survivor, genius, perfumer, killer: this is Jean-Baptiste Grenouille. He is abandoned on the filthy streets of Paris as a child, but grows up to discover he has an extraordinary gift: a sense of smell more powerful than any other human's. Soon, he is creating the most sublime fragrances in all the city. Yet there is one odour he cannot capture.

72 - The Ragged Trousered Philanthropists by Robert Tressell

The Ragged Trousered Philanthropists

The Ragged Trousered Philanthropistsis a classic representation of the impoverished and politically powerless underclass of British society in Edwardian England, ruthlessly exploited by the institutionalized corruption of their employers and the civic and religious authorities. Epic in scale, the novel charts the ruinous effects of the laissez-faire mercantilist ethics on the men, women, and children of the working classes, and through its emblematic characters, argues for a socialist politics as the only hope for a civilized and humane life for all. It is a timeless work whose political message is as relevant today as it was in Tressell's time. For this it has long been honoured by the Trade Union movement and thinkers across the political spectrum.

73 - Night Watch: A Discworld Novel by Terry Pratchett

Night Watch: A Discworld Novel

Commander Sam Vimes of the Ankh-Morpork City Watch had it all. But now he's back in his own rough, tough past without even the clothes he was standing up in when the lightning struck... Living in the past is hard. Dying in the past is incredibly easy. But he must survive, because he has a job to do. He must track down a murderer, teach his younger self how to be a good copper and change the outcome of a bloody rebellion. There's a problem: if he wins, he's got no wife, no child, no future... A Discworld Tale of One City, with a full chorus of street urchins, ladies of negotiable affection, rebels, secret policemen and other children of the revolution. Truth! Justice! Freedom! And a Hard-boiled Egg! From the Paperback edition.

74 - Matilda by Roald Dahl

Matilda

In this award-winning Dahl title Matilda invents a game of punishing her parents when they treat her badly. She soon discovers that she has supernatural powers.

75 - Bridget Jones's Diary: A Novel by Helen Fielding

Bridget Jones's Diary: A Novel

In the course of the year recorded in Bridget Jones's Diary, Bridget confides her hopes, her dreams, and her monstrously fluctuating poundage, not to mention her consumption of 5277 cigarettes and "Fat units 3457 (approx.) (hideous in every way)." In 365 days, she gains 74 pounds. On the other hand, she loses 72! There is also the unspoken New Year's resolution--the quest for the right man. Alas, here Bridget goes severely off course when she has an affair with her charming cad of a boss. But who would be without their e-mail flirtation focused on a short black skirt? The boss even contends that it is so short as to be nonexistent. At the beginning of Helen Fielding's exceptionally funny second novel, the thirtyish publishing puffette is suffering from postholiday stress syndrome but determined to find Inner Peace and poise. Bridget will, for instance, "get up straight away when wake up in mornings." Now if only she can survive the party her mother has tricked her into--a suburban fest full of "Smug Marrieds" professing concern for her and her fellow "Singletons"--she'll have made a good start. As far as she's concerned, "We wouldn't rush up to them and roar, 'How's your marriage going? Still having sex?'" This is only the first of many disgraces Bridget will suffer in her year of performance anxiety (at work and at play, though less often in bed) and living through other people's "emotional fuckwittage." Her twin-set-wearing suburban mother, for instance, suddenly becomes a chat-show hostess and unrepentant adulteress, while our heroine herself spends half the time overdosing on Chardonnay and feeling like "a tragic freak." Bridget Jones's Diary began as a column in the London Independent and struck a chord with readers of all sexes and sizes. In strokes simultaneously broad and subtle, Helen Fielding reveals the lighter side of despair, self-doubt, and obsession, and also satirizes everything from self-help books (they don't sound half as sensible to Bridget when she's sober) to feng shui, Cosmopolitan-style. She is the Nancy Mitford of the 1990s, and it's impossible not to root for her endearing heroine. On the other hand, one can only hope that Bridget will continue to screw up and tell us all about it for years and books to come

76 - The Secret History by Donna Tartt

The Secret History

A misfit at an exclusive New England college, Richard finds kindred spirits in the five eccentric students of his ancient Greek class. But his new friends have a horrific secret. When blackmail and violence threaten to blow their privileged lives apart, they drag Richard into the nightmare that engulfs them.

77 - The Woman in White by Wilkie Collins

The Woman in White

This classic novel opens with Walter Hartright's eerie encounter on a moonlit London road. Engaged as a drawing master to the beautiful Laura Fairlie, Walter is drawn into the sinister intrigues of Sir Percival Glyde and his 'charming' friend Count Fosco.

78 - Ulysses by James Joyce

Ulysses

A modernist novel of supreme stylistic innovation, James Joyce's Ulysses is the towering achievement of twentieth century literature. This Penguin Modern Classics edition includes an introduction by Declan Kiberd. For Joyce, literature 'is the eternal affirmation of the spirit of man'. Written between 1914 and 1921, Ulysses has survived bowdlerization, legal action and bitter controversy. Capturing a single day in the life of Dubliner Leopold Bloom, his friends Buck Mulligan and Stephen Dedalus, his wife Molly, and a scintillating cast of supporting characters, Joyce pushes Celtic lyricism and vulgarity to splendid extremes. An undisputed modernist classic, its ceaseless verbal inventiveness and astonishingly wide-ranging allusions confirm its standing as an imperishable monument to the human condition. Declan Kilberd says in his introduction that Ulysses is 'an endlessly open book of utopian epiphanies. It holds a mirror up to the colonial capital that was Dublin on 16 June 1904, but it also offers redemptive glimpses of a future world which might be made over in terms of those utopian moments.'

79 - Bleak House by Charles Dickens

Bleak House

The English equity court of the nineteenth century is satirized in Dicken's tale about the suit of Jarndyce vs. Jarndyce.

80 - Double Act by Jacqueline Wilson

Double Act

Ruby and Garnet are ten-year-old twins. Identical, they do everything together, especially since their mother died three years earlier. But can being a double act work for ever? When so much around them is changing.

81 - The Twits by Roald Dahl

The Twits

Mr and Mrs Twit are extremely nasty, so the Muggle-Wump monkeys and the Roly-Poly bird hatch an ingenious plan to give them just the ghastly surprise they deserve! This edition has a great new Quentin Blake cover as well as a whole new exciting end section about Roald Dahl and his world.

82 - I Capture The Castle by Dodie Smith

I Capture The Castle

Cassandra Mortmain lives with her impoverished family in a crumbling castle. Her journal records her life with her bored sister Rose, her stepmother Topaz, her little brother Thomas and her novelist father who suffers from a financially crippling writer's block. However, all their lives are turned upside down when American heirs to castle arrive.

83 - Holes by Louis Sachar

Holes

Stanley Yelnats' family has a history of bad luck going back generations, so he is not too surprised when a miscarriage of justice sends him to Camp Green Lake Juvenile Detention Centre. Nor is he very surprised when he is told that his daily labour at the camp is to dig a hole, five foot wide by five foot deep, and report anything that he finds in that hole. The warden claims that it is character building, but this is a lie and Stanley must dig up the truth. In this wonderfully inventive, compelling novel that is both serious and funny, Louis Sachar has created a masterpiece that will leave all readers amazed and delighted by the author's narrative flair and brilliantly handled plot.

84 - The Gormenghast Trilogy by Mervyn Peake

The Gormenghast Trilogy

Gormenghast is the vast, crumbling castle to which Titus Groan, is lord and heir. Titus is expected to rule this gothic labyrinth of turrets and dungeons, and his subjects, according to age-old rituals, but things are changing in the castle. He must contend with treachery, manipulation and murder and his longing for a life beyond the castle walls.

85 - The God of Small Things by Arundhati Roy

The God of Small Things

‘They all broke the rules. They all crossed into forbidden territory. They all tampered with the laws that lay down who should be loved, and how. And how much.’ This is the story of Rahel and Estha, twins growing up among the banana vats and peppercorns of their blind grandmother’s factory, and amid scenes of political turbulence in Kerala. Armed only with the innocence of youth, they fashion a childhood in the shade of the wreck that is their family: their lonely, lovely mother, their beloved Uncle Chacko (pickle baron, radical Marxist, bottom-pincher) and their sworn enemy, Baby Kochamma (ex-nun, incumbent grand-aunt). Arundhati Roy’s Booker Prize-winning novel was the literary sensation of the 1990s: a story anchored to anguish but fuelled by wit and magic.

86 - Vicky Angel by Jacqueline Wilson

Vicky Angel

Jade is used to being with and agreeing with Vicky. When a tragic accident occurs, she can hardly believe that Vicky's no longer there. But Vicky's not going stop her from living life to the full. Whether Jade is in lessons, out running or tentatively trying to make new friends, Vicky is making her presence felt. This novel presents their story.

87 - Brave New World by Aldous Huxley

Brave New World

Far in the future, the World Controllers have created the ideal society. Through clever use of genetic engineering, brainwashing and recreational sex and drugs all its members are happy consumers. Bernard Marx seems alone harbouring an ill-defined longing to break free.

88 - Cold Comfort Farm by Stella Gibbons

Cold Comfort Farm

When sensible, sophisticated Flora Poste is orphaned at nineteen, she decides her only choice is to descend upon relatives in deepest Sussex. At the aptly named Cold Comfort Farm, she meets the doomed Starkadders: cousin Judith; Amos; their sons, Seth and Reuben; and Aunt Ada Doom. But Flora loves nothing better than to organize other people.

89 - Magician (Riftwar Saga) by Raymond E. Feist

Magician (Riftwar Saga)

Raymond E. Feist's classic fantasy epic, Magician, has enchanted readers for over twenty years. The revised edition was prepared to celebrate the tenth anniversary of its publication, and incorporates over 15,000 words of text omitted from previous editions.

90 - On the Road by Jack Kerouac

On the Road

Follows the counterculture escapades of members of the Beat generation as they seek pleasure and meaning while traveling coast to coast. As he travels across 1950s America, aspiring writer Sal Paradise chronicles his escapades with the charismatic Dean Moriarty. Sal admires Dean's passion for experiencing as much as possible of life and his wild flights of poetic fancy.

91 - The Godfather by Mario Puzo

The Godfather

Offers a portrayal of the 1940s criminal underworld. This book presents the story of the Corleone family, at once drawn together and ripped apart by its position at the core of the American Mafia.

92 - The Clan of the Cave Bear (Earth's Children) by Jean M Auel

The Clan of the Cave Bear (Earth's Children)

The prequel to what will be the publishing event of 2011: the final volume of Jean M. Auel's six-book series, The Land of Painted Caves

93 - The Colour of Magic: The First Discworld Novel by Terry Pratchett

The Colour of Magic: The First  Discworld Novel

On a world supported on the back of a giant turtle (sex unknown), a gleeful, explosive, wickedly eccentric expedition sets out. There's an avaricious buy inept wizard, a naïve tourist whose luggage moves on hundreds of dear little legs, dragons who only exist ifyou believe in them, and of course THE EDGE of the planet...

94 - The Alchemist: A Fable About Following Your Dream by Paulo Coelho

The Alchemist: A Fable About Following Your Dream

'The Alchemist' is a global phenomenon, selling over 30 million copies worldwide. This exciting new edition includes exclusive content, such as a new forward to the book by the author, an interview with Paulo Coelho, and much more, providing an in-depth look at this much-loved title.

95 - Katherine by Anya Seton

Katherine

Katherine comes to the court of Edward III at the age of fifteen, and she turns the head of the King's favourite son John of Gaunt. But he is married, and she is soon to be betrothed. A few years later their paths cross again and this time their passion for each other cannot be denied or suppressed.

96 - Kane and Abel by Jeffrey Archer

Kane and Abel

Two men - ambitious, powerful, ruthless - are locked in a relentless struggle to build an empire, fueled by their all-consuming hatred.

97 - Love in the Time of Cholera by Gabriel Garcia Marquez

Love in the Time of Cholera

Fermina rebuffed Florentino Arizo and married Juvenal. Florentino has loved none but Fermina. Having sworn his love to her, he lives for the day when he can court her again. When Fermina's husband is killed, Florentino seizes his chance to declare his enduring love. But can young love find new life in the twilight of their lives?

98 - Girls In Love by Jacqueline Wilson

Girls In Love

REASONS TO READ MY BOOK, NUMBERS 1 TO 9 1. It's about three girls in Year Nine 2. You can learn all sorts of secrets about me (I'm Ellie) 3. Ditto my best friend Nadine 4. Ditto my equally best friend Magda 5. You can see if your nine all-time heros/heroines match up with mine 6. You can squirm at my most embarrassing moments 7. You can have lots of laughs (mostly at me!) 8. You might even cry a bit, too 9. PLUS, you get to find out a lot more about BOYS!

99 - The Princess Diaries by Meg Cabot

The Princess Diaries

‘You’re not Mia Thermopolis any more, honey,’ Dad said. ‘You’re Amelia Mignonette Grimaldi Thermopolis Renaldo. Princess of Genovia.’ A PRINCESS?? ME??? Yeah. Right. One minute Mia’s a totally normal Manhattan 14-year-old. Next minute she’s heir to the throne of Genovia, being trailed by a trigger-happy bodyguard, taking princess lessons with her bonkers old grandmere, and having a makeover with someone called Paolo. Well, her dad can lecture her till he’s royal-blue in the face, but no way is Mia going to turn herself into a style-queen. And they think she’s moving to Genovia? Er, hello?

100 - Midnight's Children by Salman Rushdie

Midnight's Children

Saleem Sinai was born at midnight, the midnight of India's independence, and found himself mysteriously 'handcuffed to history' by the coincidence. He is one of 1,001 children born at the midnight hour, each of them endowed with an extraordinary talent - and whose privilege and curse it is to be both master and victims of their times. Through Saleem's gifts - inner ear and wildly sensitive sense of smell - we are drawn into a fascinating family saga set against the vast, colourful background of the India of the 20th century.

101 - Three Men in a Boat by Jerome K. Jerome

Three Men in a Boat

What could be more relaxing than a refreshing holiday on the river with your two best friends and faithful canine companion, Montmorency? However, as J discovers, there is more to life on the waves than meets the eye - including navigational challenges, culinary disasters, and heroic battles with swans, kettles and tins of pineapple.

102 - Small Gods: A Discworld Novel by Terry Pratchett

Small Gods: A Discworld Novel

In the beginning was the Word. And the Word was: "Hey, you!" For Brutha the novice is the Chosen One. He wants peace and justice and brotherly love. He also wants the Inquisition to stop torturing him now, please...

103 - The Beach by Alex Garland

The Beach

Richard, backpacking around the globe in the great tradition of cheap travel, finds himself bedding down in Khao San Road, Bangkok. But his chance to rest briefly is suddenly and irrevocably destroyed when a perfect stranger called Mister Duck is killed in the room next door. Mister Duck had a secret - now it's Richard's. Armed with a map - and a name of great mystery and legend that possesses a simple majesty: Beach - our protagonist goes in search of a traveller's dream, a place where there are lots of drugs and a tolerant society that works together to maintain a life of inner peace and tranquillity. Only a select few will make it to the blissful seclusion of the Beach (Mister Duck, for one, has died) but in the great tradition of travelling bravado, or sheer stupidity, Richard decides to give it a go . . .

104 - Dracula by Bram Stoker

Dracula

When Jonathan Harker visits Transylvania to help Count Dracula with the purchase of a London house, he makes a series of horrific discoveries about his client. Soon after wards, various bizarre incidents unfold in England: an apparently unmanned ship is wrecked off the coast of Whitby and a young woman discovers strange puncture marks on her neck.

105 - Point Blanc (Alex Rider) by Anthony Horowitz

Point Blanc (Alex Rider)

Investigations into the 'accidental' deaths of two of the world's most powerful men have revealed just one link: both had a son attending Point Blanc Academy - an exclusive school for rebellious rich kids, run by the sinister Dr Grief and set high on an isolated mountain peak in the French Alps.

106 - The Pickwick Papers by Charles Dickens

The Pickwick Papers

The Pickwick Papers is Dickens' first novel and widely regarded as one of the major classics of comic writing in English. Originally serialised in monthly instalments, it quickly became a huge popular success with sales reaching 40,000 by the final number. In the century and a half since its first appearance, the characters of Mr Pickwick, Sam Weller and the whole of the Pickwickian crew have entered the consciousness of all who love English literature in general, and the works of Dickens in particular.

107 - Stormbreaker (Alex Rider) by Anthony Horowitz

Stormbreaker (Alex Rider)

Spies are great currency for exciting storylines, but few authors manage to successfully concoct realistic scenarios for a willing readership expecting chases, gunshots and thrills aplenty. In the first of what could easily become his most memorable series of novels to date, Anthony Horowitz has added a tongue-in-cheek quality to Stormbreaker that lifts it above several others in the same genre.Horowitz knows that his main character, 14-year-old Alex Rider, is a normal teenager and he never forgets this when he thrusts his young hero into the thick of several truly edge-of-seat scenarios. There is humour alongside the action too--some great characters and cutting one-liners--that helps to ensure that entertainment is high on the agenda throughout.Orphan Alex thought he knew his Uncle Ian Rider--until the elusive banker is killed in a tragic car accident. Immediately, Alex's life starts to get stranger by the day as his guardian's friends and colleagues start showing up and contradicting everything Alex thought he knew about the man he'd called Dad for so long. Maybe Ian Rider was not a banker after all? Surely the bullet holes in his Uncle's totalled car reveal that he had not died in an accident, but was murdered? Everything is explained when Alex decides to track down Ian Rider's real employers, but Alex is in for a surprise when they decide to contact him. The truth is hard to take, but maybe by following in his uncle's secret footsteps he might get the chance for revenge.Apart from a slightly over-the-top finale involving a helicopter and the roof of London's Science Museum, Stormbreaker is a refreshingly energetic yarn that is required reading for fans of the contemporary thriller. --John McLay

108 - The Wasp Factory by Iain Banks

The Wasp Factory

Frank, no ordinary sixteen-year-old, lives with his father outsIde a remote Scottish village. Their life is, to say the least, unconventional. Frank's mother abandoned them years ago: his elder brother Eric is confined to a psychiatric hospital; and his father measures out his eccentricities on an imperial scale. Frank has turned to strange acts of violence to vent his frustrations. In the bizarre daily rituals there is some solace. But when news comes of Eric's escape from the hospital Frank has to prepare the ground for his brother's inevitable return - an event that explodes the mysteries of the past and changes Frank utterly. Iain Banks' celebrated first novel is a work of extraordinary originality, imagination and horrifying compulsion: horrifying, because it enters a mind whose realities are not our own, whose values of life and death are alien to our society; and compulsive, because the humour and compassion of that mind reach out to us all.

109 - The Day Of The Jackal by Frederick Forsyth

The Day Of The Jackal

Presents the story of an anonymous Englishman who, in the spring of 1963, was hired by Colonel Marc Rodin, Operations Chief of the OAS, to assassinate General de Gaulle.

110 - The Illustrated Mum by Jacqueline Wilson

The Illustrated Mum

Dolphin adores her mother: she's got wonderful clothes, bright hair and vivid tattoos all over her body. She definitely lives a colourful life. Dolphin's older sister, Star, also loves her but is beginning to wonder if staying with a mum whose temper can be as flashy as her body-art is the best thing for the girls.

111 - Jude the Obscure by Thomas Hardy

Jude the Obscure

Jude Fawley is a rural stone mason with intellectual aspirations. Frustrated by poverty and the indifference of the academic institutions at the University of Christminster, his only chance of fulfilment seems to lie in his relationship with his unconventional cousin, Sue Bridehead.

112 - The Secret Diary of Adrian Mole Aged 13 3/4 by Sue Townsend

The Secret Diary of Adrian Mole Aged 13 3/4

At thirteen years old, Adrian Mole has more than his fair share of problems - spots, ill-health, parents threatening to divorce, rejection of his poetry and much more.

113 - The Cruel Sea by Nicholas Monsarrat

The Cruel Sea

Based on the author's own experiences, this book presents the story of the crew of HMS Compass Rose, a corvette assigned to protect convoys in World War Two. It offers descriptions of agonizing U-boat hunts. It tells of ordinary, heroic men who had to face a brutal menace which would strike without warning from the deep.

114 - Les Miserables by Victor Hugo

Les Miserables

Peopled by colourful characters from the nineteenth-century Parisian underworld; the street children, the prostitutes and the criminals, this novel tells the story of an escaped convict Jean Valjean, and his efforts to reform his ways and care for the little orphan girl he rescues from a life of cruelty.

115 - The Mayor of Casterbridge by Thomas Hardy

The Mayor of Casterbridge

Set against the backdrop of peaceful south-west England, where Thomas Hardy spent much of his youth, The Mayor of Casterbridge captures the author's unique genius for depicting the absurdity underlying much of the sorrow and humor in our lives. Michael Henchard is an out-of-work hay-trusser who gets drunk at a local fair and impulsively sells his wife Susan and baby daughter. Eighteen years later Susan and her daughter seek him out, only to discover that he has become the most prominent man in Casterbridge. Henchard attempts to make amends for his youthful misdeeds but his unchanged impulsiveness clouds his relationships in love as well as his fortunes in business. Although Henchard is fated to be a modern-day tragic hero, unable to survive in the new commercial world, his story is also a journey towards love. This edition is the only critically established text of the novel, based on a comprehensive study of the manuscript and Hardy's extensive revisions.

116 - The Dare Game (Tracy Beaker) by Jacqueline Wilson

The Dare Game (Tracy Beaker)

I'M TRACY BEAKER, THE GREAT INVENTOR OF EXTREMELY OUTRAGEOUS DARES - AND I DARE YOU TO READ A MORE BRILLIANT STORY THAN THIS!I ve bought a big fat purple notebook for writing down all my mega-manic ultra-scary stories in. But especially for my own story

117 - Bad Girls by Jacqueline Wilson

Bad Girls

Mandy has been picked on at school for as long as she can remember. That's why she is delighted when cheeky, daring, full-of-fun Tanya picks her as a friend. Mum isn't happy - she thinks Tanya's a bad girl and a bad influence. Mandy's sure Tanya can only get her out of trouble, not into it, or could she?

118 - The Picture of Dorian Gray by Oscar Wilde

The Picture of Dorian Gray

Experiments with the notion of sin as an element of design. This novel is a puzzle, intended to tease conventional minds with its exploration of the myriad interrelationships between art, life, and consequence.

119 - Shogun by James Clavell

Shogun

A bold English adventurer. An invincible Japanese warlord. A beautiful woman torn between two ways of life, two ways of love. All brought together in an extraordinary saga of a time and a place aflame with conflict, passion, ambition, lust, and the struggle for power...From the Paperback edition.

120 - The Day of the Triffids by John Wyndham

The Day of the Triffids

When Bill Masen wakes up blindfolded in hospital there is a bitter irony in his situation. Carefully removing his bandages, he realizes that he is the only person who can see: everyone else, doctors and patients alike, have been blinded by a meteor shower. Now, with civilization in chaos, the triffids - huge, venomous, large-rooted plants able to 'walk', feeding on human flesh - can have their day. The Day of the Triffids, published in 1951, expresses many of the political concerns of its time: the Cold War, the fear of biological experimentation and the man-made apocalypse. However, with its terrifyingly believable insights into the genetic modification of plants, the book is more relevant today than ever before.Contains an introduction by Barry Langford.

121 - Lola Rose by Jacqueline Wilson

Lola Rose

When Jayni, her mum and little brother have to run away from her abusive father, they slip out at night, go up to London by train and stay in a hotel. They even make up false identities to protect their secret and Jayni becomes the glamorous-sounding Lola Rose. But when the money runs out and reality bites, is it still a game they should play?

122 - Vanity Fair by William Makepeace Thackeray

Vanity Fair

Becky Sharp is a poor orphan when she first makes friends with the lovely Amelia Sedley at Miss Pinkerton's Academy for Young Ladies. She may not have the natural advantages of her companion but she more than makes up for it with her wit, charm, deviousness and determination to make a success of herself whatever the cost.

123 - The Forsyte Saga by John Galsworthy

The Forsyte Saga

When The Forsyte Saga was shown on television in 1967 it was hugely successful. The nation was gripped by the masterful visual telling of the Forsyte family's troubled story and adapted its activities to suit the next transmission. The Forsyte Saga, comprises The Man of Property, In Chancery and To Let. Initially, the narrative centres on Soames Forsyte - a successful solicitor living in London with his beautiful wife Irene. A pillar of the late Victorian upper middle class, materially wealthy, his appears to be a golden existence endowed with all the necessary possessions for a 'Man of Property', but beneath this very proper exterior lies a core of unhappiness and brutal relationships. The marriage of Soames and Irene disintegrates in bitter recrimination, creating a feud within the family that will have far-reaching consequences.

124 - House Of Leaves by Mark Z Danielewski

House Of Leaves

Johnny Truant, an employee in a LA tattoo parlour, finds a notebook kept by Zampano, a reclusive old man found dead in a cluttered apartment. Herein is the heavily annotated story of the Navidson Report. Will Navidson, a photojournalist, and his family move into a new house. What happens next is recorded on videotapes and in interviews.

125 - The Poisonwood Bible by Barbara Kingsolver

The Poisonwood Bible

This is a story told by the wife and four daughters of Nathan Price, a fierce evangelical Baptist who takes his family and mission to the Belgian Congo in 1959.

126 - Reaper Man: A Discworld Novel by Terry Pratchett

Reaper Man: A Discworld Novel

In the eleventh Discworld novel, Death is missing - presumed . . . er . . . gone. Which leads to the kind of chaos you always get when an important public service is withdrawn. Meanwhile, on a little farm far, far away, a tall dark stranger is turning out to be really good with a scythe. There's a harvest to be gathered in.

127 - Angus, thongs and full-frontal snogging by Louise Rennison

Angus, thongs and full-frontal snogging

Brilliantly funny, teenage angst author Louise Rennison's first book about the confessions of crazy but lovable Georgia Nicolson. Now repackaged in a gorgeous new paperback and looking even fabber than ever. Louise is an international bestselling author and her books can't fail to make you laugh out loud.

128 - The Hound Of The Baskervilles by Arthur Conan Doyle

The Hound Of The Baskervilles

The Baskerville family curse tells of how a terrifying hound roams the moors around Baskerville Hall and preys on members of the family in revenge for a crime committed by one of their ancestors. When Sir Charles Baskerville is found dead in his grounds, with an animal footprint near his body, the locals are convinced that the hound is back.

129 - Possession: A Romance by A S Byatt

Possession: A Romance

Winner of the 1990 Booker Prize, this novel describes the romance between two 19th-century poets and the parallel relationship of their two biographers and includes passages of 'Victorian verse'. It is structured in the form of a literary and biographical treasure hunt.

130 - The Master And Margarita by Mikhail Bulgakov

The Master And Margarita

The devil comes to Moscow wearing a fancy suit. With his disorderly band of accomplices - including a demonic, gun-toting tomcat - he immediately begins to create havoc. Margarita discovers that her lover has vanished in the chaos. Making a bargain with the devil, she decides to try a little black magic of her own to save the man she loves.

131 - The Handmaid's Tale by Margaret Atwood

The Handmaid's Tale

The Republic of Gilead offers Offred only one function: to breed. If she deviates, she will, like dissenters, be hanged at the wall or sent out to die slowly of radiation sickness. But even a repressive state cannot obliterate desire - neither Offred's nor that of the two men on which her future hangs. Brilliantly conceived and executed, this powerful evocation of twenty-first century America gives full rein to Margaret Atwood's devastating irony, wit and astute perception.

132 - Danny the Champion of the World by Roald Dahl

Danny the Champion of the World

"My father, without the slightest doubt, was the most marvellous and exciting father any boy ever had". Danny feels very lucky. He adores his life with his father, living in a gypsy caravan, listening to his stories, tending their gas station, puttering around the workshop, and occasionally taking off to fly home-built gas balloons and kites. His father has raised him on his own, ever since Danny's mother died when he was four months old. Life is peaceful and wonderful ... until he turns 9 and discovers his father's one vice. Soon Danny finds himself the mastermind behind the most incredible plot ever attempted against nasty Victor Hazell, a wealthy landowner with a bad attitude. Can they pull it off? If so, Danny will truly be the champion of the world. Danny is right up to Roald Dahl's impishly brilliant standards. An intense and beautiful father-son relationship is balanced with subtle escapades that will have even the most rigid law-abider rooting them on. Dahl's inimitable way with words leaves the reader simultaneously satisfied and itching for more.

133 - East of Eden by John Steinbeck

East of Eden

'Our species is the only creative species, and it has only one creative instrument, the individual mind and spirit of a man.'California's fertile Salinas Valley is home to two families whose destinies are fruitfully, and fatally, intertwined. Over the generations, between the beginning of the twentieth century and the end of the First World War, the Trasks and the Hamiltons will helplessly replay the fall of Adam and Eve and the murderous rivalry of Cain and Abel.East of Eden was considered by Steinbeck to be his magnum opus, and its epic scope and memorable characters, exploring universal themes of love and identity, ensure it remains one of America's most enduring novels.

134 - George's Marvellous Medicine by Roald Dahl

George's Marvellous Medicine

In this popular Dahl story, George creates a very special medicine to cure his grandma of her nasty habits. Great new Quentin Blake cover as well as a whole new exciting end section about Roald Dahl and his world.

135 - Wyrd Sisters: A Discworld Novel by Terry Pratchett

Wyrd Sisters: A Discworld Novel

Witches are not by nature gregarious, and they certainly don't have leaders. Granny Weatherwax was the most highly-regarded of the leaders they didn't have. But even she found that meddling in royal politics was a lot more difficult than certain playwrights would have you believe...

136 - The Color Purple by Alice Walker

The Color Purple

Set in the deep American south between the wars, this is the classic tale of Celie, a young poor black girl. Raped repeatedly by her father, she loses two children and then is married off to a man who treats her no better than a slave. She is separated from her sister Nettie and dreams of becoming like the glamorous Shug Avery, a singer and rebellious black woman who has taken charge of her own destiny. Gradually Celie discovers the support of women that enables her to leave the past behind and begin a new life.

137 - Hogfather: A Discworld Novel by Terry Pratchett

Hogfather: A Discworld Novel

It's the night before hogswatch. And its too quiet . Where is the big jolly fat man? Why is Death creeping down chimneys and trying to say Ho Ho Ho? The darkest night of the year is getting a lot darker... Susan the gothic governess has got to sort it out by morning, otherwise there won't be a morning.

138 - The Thirty-Nine Steps by John Buchan

The Thirty-Nine Steps

Richard Hannay finds a corpse in his flat, and becomes involved in a plot by spies to precipitate war and subvert British naval power. The resourceful victim of a manhunt, he is pursued by both the police and the ruthless conspirators. The Thirty-Nine Steps is a seminal 'chase' thriller, rapid and vivid. It has been widely influential and frequently dramatised: the film directed by Alfred Hitchcock became a screen classic. This engaging novel also provides insights into the inter-action of patriotism, fear and prejudice.

139 - Girls In Tears by Jacqueline Wilson

Girls In Tears

Ellie, Magda and Nadine are back - but they're not very happy. Ellie's romance with Russell is teetering on the rocks. Magda's lost her pet. Nadine is fed up with the other two lecturing her about the dangers of meeting someone on the Internet. She thinks her e-mail boyfriend sounds wonderful. Can the girls' friendship survive these testing times?

140 - Sleepovers by Jacqueline Wilson

Sleepovers

Amy, Bella, Chloe, Daisy and Emily are friends at school and have their own Alphabet Club. Daisy is the newest member and is desperate to fit in, even though Chloe is distinctly unfriendly to her at times. Throughout Daisy's first year at the school, the girls plan ever-more elaborate sleepover parties for their birthdays.

141 - All Quiet on the Western Front by Erich Maria Remarque

All Quiet on the Western Front

One by one the boys begin to fall... In 1914 a room full of German schoolboys, fresh-faced and idealistic, are goaded by their schoolmaster to troop off to the 'glorious war'. With the fire and patriotism of youth they sign up. What follows is the moving story of a young 'unknown soldier' experiencing the horror and disillusionment of life in the trenches.

142 - Behind The Scenes At The Museum by Kate Atkinson

Behind The Scenes At The Museum

Ruby Lennox was conceived grudgingly by Bunty and born while her father, George, was in the Dog and Hare in Doncaster telling a woman in an emerald dress and a D-cup that he wasn't married. Bunty had never wanted to marry George, but here she was, stuck in a flat above the pet shop in an ancient street beneath York Minster.

143 - High Fidelity by Nick Hornby

High Fidelity

Rob is good on music: he owns a small record shop and has strong views on what's decent and what isn't. But he's much less good on relationships. In fact, he's not at all sure that he wants to commit himself to anyone. So it's hardly surprising that his girlfriend decides that enough is enough.

144 - It by Stephen King

It

Stephen King's idea for It came from a favorite childhood image: the entire cast of the Bugs Bunny Show coming on at the beginning. He thought of bringing on all the monsters, one last time: Dracula, Frankenstein's creature, the Werewolf, the Crawling Eye, Rodan, It Came from Outer Space. It is about a group of adults who were once troubled children in the late '50s--"The Losers." One of them is a best selling horror writer much like Stephen King (or his friend and collaborator Peter Straub). In order to defeat the protean "It" that threatens their hometown, they have to go back- -not only to the town itself, but deep into their childhood memories, to regain the talent for magic they once had. King says It is for "the buried child in us, but I'm writing for the grown-up, too. I want grown-ups to look at the child long enough to be able to give him up." This huge, baggy beast of a novel is a favorite of Stephen King fans--second in popularity only to The Stand. Perhaps longtime fans develop mental filters for King's sloppy storytelling to tune out the repetitions and silliness. King is like the pointillist painter Seurat: if you stand too close to the little dots, the picture falls apart, and it looks meaningless. That's why he makes the storyscape so big--to take you up to that macro-level where you like the book in spite of its flaws. --Fiona Webster

145 - James and the Giant Peach by Roald Dahl

James and the Giant Peach

An enormous escaped rhinoceros from London Zoo has eaten James's parents. And it gets worse! James is packed off to live with his two really horrible aunts, Sponge and Spiker. Poor James is miserable, until something peculiar happens and Jame's finds himself on the most wonderful and extraordinary adventure he could ever imagine ...

146 - The Green Mile by Stephen King

The Green Mile

At Cold Mountain Penitentiary, along the lonely stretch of cells known as the Green Mile, killers await death, whilst their guards watch over them. Good or evil, innocent or guilty, none of them have ever seen the likes of brutal new prisoner John Coffey, seemingly a devil in human form.

147 - Papillon by Henri Charrière

Papillon

A classic memoir of prison breaks and adventure -- a bestselling phenomenon of the 1960s

148 - Men at Arms: A Discworld Novel by Terry Pratchett

Men at Arms: A Discworld Novel

Features Corporal Carrot (technically a dwarf), Lance-constable Cuddy (really a dwarf), Lance constable Detritus (a troll), Lance constable Angua (a woman... most of the time) and Corporal Nobbs (disqualified from the human race for shoving), who've only got twenty-four hours to clean up the town, Ankh-Morpork.

149 - Master and Commander by Patrick O'Brian

Master and Commander

The beginning to the sweeping Aubrey/Maturin series and inspiration for the major new motion picture starring Russell Crowe. "The best sea story I have ever read."-Sir Francis Chichester

150 - Skeleton Key (Alex Rider): Alex Rider 3 by Anthony Horowitz

Skeleton Key (Alex Rider): Alex Rider 3

Working as a secret agent for Britain's most exclusive agency, 15-year-old Alex Rider is now about to face something more dangerous that he can imagine: a man who has lost everything he cared for and who has a nuclear weapon.

151 - Soul Music: A Discworld Novel by Terry Pratchett

Soul Music: A Discworld Novel

It's hard to grow up normally when Grandfather rides a white horse and wields a scythe - especially when you have to take over the family business, and everyone mistakes you for the Tooth Fairy. And especially when you have to face the new and addictive music that has entered Discworld.

152 - Thief of Time: A Discworld Novel by Terry Pratchett

Thief of Time: A Discworld Novel

Time is a resource. Everyone knows it has to be managed. And on the Discworld that is the job of the Monks of History, who store it and pump it from the places where it's wasted (like the underwater - how much time does a codfish need?) to places like cities, where there's never enough time. But the construction of the world's first truly accurate clock starts a race against, well, time for Lu Tze and his apprentice Lobsang Ludd. Because it will stop time. And that will only be the start of everyone's problems. THIEF OF TIME comes complete with a full supporting cast of heroes, villains, yetis, martial artists and Ronnie, the fifth Horseman of the Apocalypse (who left before they became famous).

153 - The Fifth Elephant: A Discworld Novel by Terry Pratchett

The Fifth Elephant: A Discworld Novel

SAM VIMES IS A MAN ON THE RUN. YESTERDAY HE WAS A DUKE, A CHIEF OF POLICE AND THE AMBASSADOR TO THE MYSERIOUS, FAT-RICH COUNTRY OF UBERWALD.Now he has nothing but his native wit and the gloomy trousers of Uncle Vanya (don t ask). It s snowing. It s free

154 - Atonement by Ian McEwan

Atonement

A story that begins with three young people in the garden of a country house on the hottest day of 1935, and ends with three profoundly changed lives. A depiction of love and war, class, childhood and England, that explores shame and forgiveness, atonement and the possibility of absolution.

155 - Secrets by Jacqueline Wilson

Secrets

India lives in a large, luxurious house with a mum she can't stand and a dad she adores, though he hasn't had much time for her recently. She seeks solace in her journal, which she keeps in sincere imitation of her heroine, Anne Frank. Treasure lives on the local council estate with her loving and capable grandmother.

156 - The Silver Sword by Ian Serraillier

The Silver Sword

"If you meet Ruth or Edek or Bronia, you must tell them I'm going to Switzerland to find their mother. Tell them to follow as soon as they can" Having lost their parents in the chaos of war, Ruth, Edek and Bronia are left alone to fend for themselves and hide from the Nazis amid the rubble and ruins of their city. They meet a ragged orphan boy, Jan, who treasures a paperknife - a silver sword - which was entrusted to him by an escaped prisoner of war. The three children realise that the escapee was their father, the silver sword a message that he is alive and searching for them. Together with Jan they begin a dangerous journey across the battlefields of Europe to find their parents.

157 - One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest by Ken Kesey

One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest

Presents the story of a mental ward and its inhabitants, especially the tyrannical Big Nurse Ratched and Randle Patrick McMurphy, the brawling, fun-loving new inmate who resolves to oppose her.

158 - Heart of Darkness by Joseph Conrad

Heart of Darkness

Reflects the savage repressions carried out in the Congo by the Belgians in one of the largest acts of genocide committed up to that time.

159 - Kim by Rudyard Kipling

Kim

This novel tells the story of Kimball O'Hara (Kim), who is the orphaned son of a soldier in the Irish regiment stationed in India during the British Raj. It describes Kim's life and adventures from street vagabond, to his adoption by his father's regiment and recruitment into espionage.

160 - Cross Stitch by Diana Gabaldon

Cross Stitch

Claire Randall is leading a double life. She has a husband in one century - and a lover in another. On holiday with her husband just after the war, she walks through a stone circle in the Scottish Highlands and into a violent skirmish taking place in 1743 A wartime nurse, Claire can deal with the bloody wounds that face her; it is harder to deal with the knowledge that she is in Jacobite Scotland and the carnage of Culloden is looming. Marooned amid the passion and violence, the superstition, the shifting allegiances and the fervent loyalties, Claire is in terrible danger from Jacobites and Redcoats - and from the shock of her own desire for a courageous renegade.

161 - Moby-Dick by Herman Melville

Moby-Dick

When Ishmael sets sail on the whaling ship Pequod one cold Christmas Day, he has no idea of the horrors awaiting him out on the vast and merciless ocean. The ship's strange captain, Ahab, is in the grip of an obsession to hunt down the famous white whale, Moby Dick, and will stop at nothing on his quest to annihilate his nemesis.

162 - River God by Wilbur Smith

River God

River God is the first of Wilbur Smith's fascinating adventure stories set in ancient Egypt about the land of the Pharaohs

163 - Sunset Song by Lewis Grassic Gibbon

Sunset Song

Scotland's favorite modern novel "Sunset Song" is the first volume in Gibbon's revered trilogy, "A Scot's Quair." In it, he chronicles the life of young Chris Guthrie. Living in the harsh landscape of northern Scotland, she is torn between her passion for the land, duty to her family, and love of books. When her mother kills herself and her two youngest children, Chris and her father are left to run the farm on their own. But everything changes once more as the First World War begins. Infused with local vernacular, "Sunset Song" is a poignant and intense portrait of Scottish life in the early twentieth century.

164 - The Shipping News by Annie Proulx

The Shipping News

Quoyle is a hapless, hopeless hack journalist living and working in New York. When his no-good wife is killed in a spectacular road accident, Quoyle heads for the land of his forefathers -- the remotest corner of far-flung Newfoundland. With 'the aunt' and his delinquent daughters -- Bunny and Sunshine -- in tow, Quoyle finds himself part of an unfolding, exhilarating Atlantic drama. 'The Shipping News' is an irresistible comedy of human life and possibility.

165 - The World According To Garp by John Irving

The World According To Garp

Focuses on the life and times of T S Garp, the bastard son of Jenny Fields - a feminist leader ahead of her times. This title also focuses on the life and death of a famous mother and her almost-famous son.

166 - Lorna Doone by R.D. Blackmore

Lorna Doone

Lorna Doone, a Romance of Exmoor is an historical novel of high adventure set in the South West of England during the turbulent time of Monmouth's rebellion (1685). It is also a moving love story told through the life of the young farmer John Ridd, as he grows to manhood determined to right the wrongs in his land, and to win the heart and hand of the beautiful Lorna Doone.

167 - Girls Out Late by Jacqueline Wilson

Girls Out Late

Ellie and Russell are drawn together by their shared enjoyment of art. And as Ellie runs into trouble with a parent who thinks his daughter is too young for after-dark trysts in the park with oh-so-gorgeous Russell, Magda has a crush on a teacher and Nadine's falling for slimy Liam again.

168 - The Far Pavilions by Mary Margaret Kaye

The Far Pavilions

A novel set in India at the time of mutiny. It tells of a story of 19th Century India, when the thin patina of English rule held down dangerously turbulent undercurrents. It also tells of a story about an English man - Ashton Pelham-Martyn - brought up as a Hindu and his passionate, but dangerous love for an Indian princess.

169 - The Witches by Roald Dahl

The Witches

A book about 'real witches' - the ones that absolutely loathe children and are always plotting to get rid of them. Great new Quentin Blake cover as well as a whole new exciting end section about Roald Dahl and his world.

170 - Charlotte's Web by E. B. White

Charlotte's Web

Presents the tale of how a little girl named Fern, with the help of a friendly spider, saved her pig Wilbur from the usual fate of nice fat little pigs.

171 - Frankenstein: Or, the Modern Prometheus by Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley

Frankenstein: Or, the Modern Prometheus

Victor Frankenstein's story is one of ambition, murder and revenge. As a young scientist he pushed moral boundaries in order to cross the final scientific frontier and create life. But his creation is a monster stitched together from grave-robbed body parts who has no place in the world, and his life can only lead to tragedy.

172 - They Used to Play on Grass by Gordon Williams

They Used to Play on Grass

Published in 1970 when Terry Venables was still a Queen's Park Rangers player, this was the first of several books written with Gordon Williams. In this story, manager John Gallagher is rocked by a fresh threat to his dream, three days before one of the biggest matches in soccer history.

173 - The Old Man and the Sea by Ernest Hemingway

The Old Man and the Sea

The old man has gone 84 days without catching a fish, everything about him is old except his eyes, they are the colour of the sea. He finally catches a fish, but this is no ordinary fish, nor is his fierce and determined response.

174 - The Name of the Rose by Umberto Eco

The Name of the Rose

Who is killing monks in a great medieval abbey famed for its library - and why? Brother William of Baskerville is sent to find out, taking with him the assistant who later tells the tale of his investigations. This story combines elements of detective fiction, metaphysical thriller, post-modernist puzzle and historical novel.

175 - Sophie's World: A Novel About the History of Philosophy by Jostein Gaarder

Sophie's World: A Novel About the History of Philosophy

Sophie finds two questions in her mailbox: "Who are you?" and "Where does the world come from?" This is the start of her journey through the history of philosophy, guided by a mysterious mentor. To find the truth, we must understand the questions, but the truth is stranger than Sophie can imagine.

176 - Dustbin Baby by Jacqueline Wilson

Dustbin Baby

April knows she was found in a dustbin fourteen years ago as a new-born baby. And now she's fairly happily settled with her foster mother, Marion. But she's desperate to recall what happened in the intervening years, and to see if she can find out where she really came from in the first place. This novel presents her story.

177 - Fantastic Mr Fox by Roald Dahl

Fantastic Mr Fox

Boggis, Bunce and Bean are the meanest three farmers you could meet. They are determined to get Mr Fox - but he has other plans! This edition has a great new Quentin Blake cover and new author biography.

178 - Lolita by Vladimir Nabokov

Lolita

A novel that establishes the author's reputation with a large audience tour-de-force of comic satire on sex and the American ways of life.

179 - Jonathan Livingston Seagull: A story by Richard Bach

Jonathan Livingston Seagull: A story

Jonathan Livingston Seagull, the most celebrated inspirational fable of our time, tells the story of a bird determined to be more than ordinary. This bestselling modern classic, reissued with a beautiful new cover design, is a story for people who want to follow their dreams and make their own rules and has inspired people for decades.

180 - The Little Prince by Antoine De Saint-Exupery

The Little Prince

This parable tells the story of an air pilot who meets a Little Prince when he has to make a forced landing in the Sahara Desert. The Little Prince tells him wise and enchanted stories.

181 - The Suitcase Kid by Jacqueline Wilson

The Suitcase Kid

When my parents split up they didn't know what to do with me... My family always lived at Mulberry Cottage. Mum, Dad, me - and Radish, my Sylvanian rabbit. But now, Mum lives with Bill the Baboon and his three kids. Dad lives with Carrie and her twins. And where do I live? I live out of a suitcase. One week with Mum's family, one week with Dad's.

182 - Oliver Twist by Charles Dickens

Oliver Twist

Scathing in its indictment of a cruel society, and pervaded by an unforgettable sense of threat and mystery, this novel is peopled with some of memorable characters (the arch-villain Fagin, the artful Dodger, the menacing Bill Sikes and the prostitute Nancy). It combines the elements of Gothic Romance, the Newgate Novel and popular melodrama.

183 - The Power of One by Bryce Courtenay

The Power of One

Set in South Africa in the 1940s, this is the story of Peekay, a young boy with one ambition - to become welterweight champion of the world. With the help of a boxing coach, he becomes a small but invincible fighter who champions the African people against the power of the Boer.

184 - Silas Marner by George Eliot

Silas Marner

Falsely accused of theft and cast out by the religious community of which he was a member, Silas Marner leaves his home and settles in Raveloe, where he leads a solitary existence as a weaver. Marner's work is in great demand, and the wealth that he accumulates becomes his consolation for all that he has lost; but when Dunstan Cass, one of the squire's sons, steals Marner's money the weaver loses his only remaining reason for living. However, one winter night, a little girl wanders into Marner's cottage out of the snow, and the weaver's life is changed for ever.

185 - American Psycho by Bret Easton Ellis

American Psycho

Patrick Bateman is twenty-six and works on Wall Street; he is handsome, sophisticated, charming and intelligent. He is also a psychopath. Taking us to a head-on collision with America's greatest dream and its worst nightmare American Psychois a bleak, bitter, black comedy about a world we all recognize but do not wish to confront. ' American Psychois a beautifully controlled, careful, important novel . . . The novelist's function is to keep a running tag on the progress of the culture; and he's done it brilliantly . . . A seminal book' Fay Weldon, Washington Post 'The first novel to come along in years that takes on deep and Dostoyevskian themes . . . Ellis is showing older authors where the hands have come to on the clock' Norman Mailer, Vanity Fair 'Serious, clever and shatteringly effective . . . For its savagely coherent picture of a society lethally addicted to blandness, it should be judged by the highest standards' Sunday Times

186 - The Diary of a Nobody by George Grossmith

The Diary of a Nobody

Mr Pooter is an office clerk and upright family man in a dull 1880s suburb. His diary is a portrait of the class system and the inherent snobbishness of the suburban middle classes. It sends up contemporary crazes for Aestheticism, spiritualism and bicycling.

187 - Trainspotting by Irvine Welsh

Trainspotting

Choose us. Choose life. Choose mortgage payments; choose washing machines; choose cars; choose sitting on a couch watching mind-numbing and spirit-crushing game shows, stuffing fuckin junk food intae yir mooth. Choose rotting away, pishing and shiteing yersel in a home, a total fuckin embarrassment tae the selfish, fucked-up brats ye’ve produced. Choose life.

188 - Welcome to Dead House (Goosebumps) by R. L. Stine

Welcome to Dead House (Goosebumps)

It takes place in a neighborhood called Dark Falls.This family of five moved into this weird and creepy house. Josh and Amanda are the main characters. They tell their parents that the house is creepy but their parents do not believe them. The day they moved in, Josh looked in the window of his room and sees a little boy. So he runs up the stairs and at the top of the stairs and he is not there. So Josh lays down for a little and he hears giggling so he gets out of bed and tries to follow the giggling and it lead him to the closet so he opened it and nothing was there. His father tells him and his sister to go make some new friends. So they met a kid named Ray. Ray was showing them their way to the park and Ray tells Josh that he lived in the house Josh's family just moved into. Josh thinks that he has seen Ray before. He thinks that Ray was the boy that was in his window, closet, and the boy at the top of the stairs. Could Ray be the boy that Josh keeps seeing?

189 - Heidi by Johanna Spyri

Heidi

Little Heidi goes to live with her grandfather in his lonely hut high in the Alps and she quickly learns to love her new life. But her strict aunt decides to send her away again to live in the town. Heidi cannot bear being away from the mountains and is determined to return to the happiness of life with her grandfather.

190 - Sons and Lovers by D.H. Lawrence

Sons and Lovers

Paul Morel is the focus of his disappoited and fiercely protective mother's life. Their tender, devoted and intense bond comes under strain when Paul falls in love with Miriam Leivers, a local girl his mother disapproves of. The arrival of the provocatively modern Clara Dawes causes further tension and Paul is torn bewtween his individual desires and family alleigences. Set in a Nottinghamshire mining town at the turn of the twentieth century, this is a powerful portrayal of family and love in all its forms.

191 - The Unbearable Lightness of Being by Milan Kundera

The Unbearable Lightness of Being

A novel of irreconcilable loves and infidelities, which embraces all aspects of human existence, and addresses the nature of twentieth-century 'Being'.

192 - Man and Boy by Tony Parsons

Man and Boy

A fabulously engaging and exciting novel about a man who has to learn about life and love the hard way. Harry Silver has it all. A successful job in TV, a gorgeous wife, a lovely child. And in one moment of madness, he chucks it all away. Man and Boy is the story of how he comes to terms with his life and achieves a degree of self-respect, bringing up his son alone and, gradually, learning what words like love and family really mean. It is very well written, pacy, funny, and heart-breakingly moving.

193 - The Truth: A Discworld Novel by Terry Pratchett

The Truth: A Discworld Novel

While filling his pages with reports of local club meetings and pictures of humorously shaped vegetables, William accidentally discovers dark forces plotting to overthrow the city's ruler.

194 - The War of the Worlds by H.G. Wells

The War of the Worlds

The night after a shooting star is seen streaking through the sky from Mars, a cylinder is discovered on Horsell Common in London. At first, naive locals approach the cylinder armed just with a white flag only to be quickly killed by an all-destroying heat-ray, as terrifying tentacled invaders emerge.

195 - The Horse Whisperer by Nicholas Evans

The Horse Whisperer

In the still of a snow-covered morning in upstate New York, a girl out riding her horse is hit by a 40-ton truck. Though horribly injured, both thirteen-year-old Grace Maclean and her horse Pilgrim survive. But the impact on their lives is devastating.Grace is the only child of prominent New York magazine editor, Annie Graves, and her lawyer husband Robert. In a way that none of them at first understands, their destiny comes to depend on Pilgrim's. So mutilated and traumatised is he that even the vet who saved him wishes he hadn't. Annie refuses to have him put down, sensing that if she does, something in Grace will die too.Then Annie hears about a man called Tom Booker, a 'whisperer' who is said to have the gift of healing troubled horses. Abandoning her job, Annie sets off across the continent with Grace and Pilgrim to find him. Under the massive Montana sky, all their lives are changed for ever.

196 - A Fine Balance by Rohinton Mistry

A Fine Balance

Set in mid-1970s India, A Fine Balance is a subtle and compelling narrative about four unlikely characters who come together in circumstances no one could have foreseen soon after the government declares a 'State of Internal Emergency'. It is a breathtaking achievement: panoramic yet humane, intensely political yet rich with local delight; and, above all, compulsively readable.

197 - Witches Abroad: A Discworld Novel by Terry Pratchett

Witches Abroad: A Discworld Novel

It seemed an easy job... After all, how difficult could it be to make sure that a servant girl doesn't marry a prince? But for the witches Granny Weatherwax, Nanny Ogg and Magrat Garlick, travelling to the distant city of Genua, things are never that simple... Servant girls have to marry the prince. That's what life is all about. You can't fight a Happy Ending. At least - up until now...

198 - The Once and Future King by T. H. White

The Once and Future King

Describes King Arthur's life from his childhood to the coronation, creation of the Round Table, and search for the Holy Grail

199 - The Very Hungry Caterpillar by Eric Carle

The Very Hungry Caterpillar

Eric Carle's The Very Hungry Caterpillar is a perennial favourite with children and adults alike. Its imaginative illustration and clever cut-out detail charts the progress of a very hungry caterpillar as he eats his way through the week.

200 - Flowers in the Attic by Virginia Andrews

Flowers in the Attic

The haunting young adult gothic romance classic that launched Virginia Andrews’ incredible best-selling career. Up in the attic, four secrets are hidden. Four blonde, beautiful, innocent little secrets, struggling to stay alive… Chris, Cathy, Cory and Carrie have perfect lives – until a tragic accident changes everything. Now they must wait, hidden from view in their grandparents’ attic, as their mother tries to figure out what to do next. But as days turn into weeks and weeks into months, the siblings endure unspeakable horrors and face the terrifying realisation that they might not be let out of the attic after all.